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Voting news articles are provided here for research and educational purposes only. We do not review each article in its entirety prior to its posting. Content in the articles themselves and on other websites to which they link may express opinions that are not those of VotersUnite!

Few states follow Oregon's mail voting lead    Story Here  Archive
BRAD CAIN / Associated Press 09 October 2004
While other states pursue high-tech voting machines in hopes of avoiding a repeat of the nation's 2000 electoral debacle, Oregon continues with its low-tech — and unique — system of vote-by-mail.
"Oregon has been proselytizing this system aggressively, but there is unease about it" in other states, said Norm Ornstein, a political analyst at the American Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C.


Former foes join forces for election reform    Story Here  Archive
LEDYARD KING Gannett News Service 10 October 2004
WASHINGTON Two years after they faced off on the ballot, Rush Holt and DeForest "Buster" Soaries are united in trying to fix it.
Holt, a Democratic congressman representing New Jersey's 12th District, and Soaries, a Republican who tried to unseat him in 2002, have plunged into the cause of electoral reform.


State notified of flaw in new voting machines    Story Here  Archive
CHRISTINA NUCKOLS, The Virginian-Pilot 08 October 2004
RICHMOND — New touch-screen computers designed to improve voting security are being tested in Virginia this year, but manufacturers already have notified state leaders of a flaw that causes the machines to shut down unexpectedly.

Judge sets conference on paperless voting challenge    Story Here  Archive
By George Bennett Palm Beach Post 08 October 2004
A federal judge in Fort Lauderdale has ordered a conference today on U.S. Rep. Robert Wexler's legal challenge to paperless voting — raising the possibility of a trial and ruling on the hot-button issue before the Nov. 2 election.

Speakout: Electronic voting is safe and reliable    Story Here  Archive
Faye Griffin and Susan Miller in Rocky Mountain News 08 October 2004
The first voting machine was used in Rochester, N.Y., in 1892, and by 1930, residents of most of the major cities voted on mechanical machines. Then in the 1980s, computer technology was combined with the voting machine and the direct-record voting machine was born.
Several Colorado counties are today successfully using direct-record machines. The machines have replaced punch cards, lever machines and optical scan voting, providing convenience for voters and allowing election officials to tally election results in a precise manner.


Md. elections CIO says e-voting flaws ?mitigated?    Story Here  Archive
By Trudy Walsh Government Computer News 08 October 2004
Maryland voters can rest assured their votes will be safely and accurately counted next month, said Pamela Woodside, CIO of the Maryland Elections Board.
Woodside spoke yesterday at an Association for Federal Information Resources Management luncheon in Washington.


Why E-Voting Still Is Not E-nough    Story Here  Archive
By Jill S. Farrell Free Congress Foundation and Cybercast News Service 08 October 2004
The Free Congress Foundation is an educational foundation with conservative roots and an extensive history of encouraging citizens to become effectively involved in the political process. Although we are generally in favor of voter-verifiable, paper-ballot systems, we see this issue as one of voter confidence.

Electronic voting too flawed, unreliable for use    Story Here  Archive
Paul Corkery The Triangle (Drexel University) 08 October 2004
There are only about four weeks left until the Presidential election and probably only four weeks and a day left until the recount begins. We all remember the voting debacle that occurred in Florida during the 2000 election. One citizen, one vote? - Clarence Thomas certainly cast a few more votes than most. Judicial partisanship aside, no one wants a repeat of 2000. There is, however, a dark cloud looming on the voting front, and it comes in the form of electronic voting (e-voting) machines.

Integrity of e-vote machines questioned    Story Here  Archive
By Gordon Y.K. Pang Honolulu Advertiser 08 October 2004
A coalition of concerned residents is urging voters to boycott using the state's new electronic voting machines and to stick to the standard paper ballot option when they go to the ballot booth for the general election.

Printers unlikely for touch-screen machines even if suit succeeds    Story Here  Archive
By ADRIAN SAINZ Associated Press 08 October 2004
A lawsuit demanding touch-screen voting machines be made to produce paper records won't be heard until Oct. 18, a judge ruled Friday, raising doubts that any significant changes to the current system will happen before the November election.

Florida in election crosshairs again    Story Here  Archive
By JAMES ROSEN, McClatchy Washington Bureau 08 October 2004
MIAMI (SMW) - For Floridians battered by a record spate of hurricanes, the political forecast is no less stormy: Expect a tumultuous, unpredictable finish to the presidential race with the Sunshine State again playing a decisive role in determining the winner.

Ballots at risk: why voters should be wary    Story Here  Archive
Thomas Hargrove KnoxNews (Scripps) 06 October 2004
An analysis of punch-card ballots cast in a rural Illinois county two years ago found dozens of invalidating mistakes, signaling pitfalls for voters across America in November's presidential election.

Md. elections CIO offers e-voting assurances    Story Here  Archive
BY Michael Hardy Federal Computer Week 07 October 2004
As Election Day draws closer, Maryland officials are reassuring voters that the electronic voting machines that will be used in almost all of the state's polling places have been made secure.

Five minutes for democracy    Story Here  Archive
Opinion from Michael Carrier Philadelphia Daily News 07 October 2004
THE BITTER wounds opened by the 2000 presidential election continue to fester. But if we don't act to address the dangers of electronic voting machines, the 2004 election may be far worse, with potentially devastating and irreparable consequences for democracy.

Critics: State?s e-voting touch and go    Story Here  Archive
By Darrell Smith The Desert Sun 07 October 2004
COACHELLA VALLEY Voting rights activists are urging voters in Riverside and San Bernardino counties to cast absentee ballots in the Nov. 2 election, bypassing touch-screen voting machines they say are risky and unreliable.

Big turnout preparations    Story Here  Archive
By JOHN REITMEYER Burlington County Times 07 October 2004
MOUNT HOLLY - The Burlington County Board of Freeholders is purchasing 20 used voting machines to make sure the county is prepared to handle what might be a high turnout on Election Day next month.

No harm done with glitches, election officials say    Story Here  Archive
By Richard Borreca Honolulu Star-Bulletin 07 October 2004
Election officials say they are "going through a learning process" as they try to combine two different voting machine systems used in this year's elections.
Last month, problems popped up in the reports of the primary election votes.


Computer expert still in Maelstrom Officials say voting machines secure    Story Here  Archive
Linda Strowbridge Owings Mills Times 07 October 2004
He has alternately been called an enemy of democracy and a high-tech champion of civil rights.
Aviel Rubin, a soft-spoken computer scientist who lives in Owings Mills, has been a flash point in the national fight over electronic voting ever since he reported that Maryland's new voting machines might be vulnerable to tampering.


Election Fears Are the Latest Hurricane for Sunshine State    Story Here  Archive
BY Jonathan Tilove Newhouse News Service 07 October 2004
MIAMI Patrick Merloe travels the globe promoting free and fair elections. Everywhere from Afghanistan to Angola, he says, he is asked the same question: "What's happening in Florida?"

Hearing on lawsuit over touch-screen voting set for Friday    Story Here  Archive
CORALIE CARLSON Associated Press 07 October 2004
MIAMI - A lawsuit demanding that touch-screen voting machines be made to produce paper records moved ahead Thursday after a federal appeals court refused to reconsider its decision to revive the case.
The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected a motion by Secretary of State Glenda Hood to have all 12 judges hear the case. Last week, a three-judge panel ordered a federal judge hold a trial.


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